Technology & Innovation Management UK | Consultancy UK | 10 August 2017

Applying agile approaches to improve breakthrough innovationArthur D. Little's eighth Innovation Excellence Survey has revealed that the approaches that have been successful at improving innovation delivery over the last 30 years are holding most organizat

Arthur D. Little's eighth Innovation Excellence Survey has revealed that the approaches that have been successful at improving innovation delivery over the last 30 years are holding most organizations back. Senior executives in product- and process-technology companies are already championing agile approaches to improve breakthrough innovation performance. In this article, Mitch Beaumont, Ben Thuriaux, Prashanth Prasad and Chandler Hatton at Arthur D. Little, discuss why creating a separate path with agile principles tuned for a product development environment has been shown to be an effective approach.

Technology & Innovation Management | My Customer | 03 August 2017

How to apply agile approaches to drive product innovation

Breakthrough innovation - innovation aimed at delivering disruptive impact, or creating new market spaces or step-changes in product, process or business-model performance - is increasingly important for companies. However, outside of the software industry most organizations, especially those with complex engineered products and longer development lifecycles, struggle to deliver it systematically. This is principally because the agile approach needed to realize breakthroughs is a challenge to the established practices that have served them well. In this article, Mitch Beaumont, Ben Thuriaux, Prashanth Prasad and Chandler Hatton at Arthur D. Little, look at how non-software product-based companies can successfully embrace agile, as well as non-agile, methods in a complementary way.

Technology & Innovation Management UK | UK Business Awards | 01 August 2017

Adding agile to improve breakthrough innovation in product development

Phase-gate, or waterfall, approaches, which companies have used for the last three decades to improve innovation performance, are being found to hold companies back when it comes to breakthrough innovation. Instead, senior executives in product- and process-technology companies are turning to agile approaches. In this article, Mitch Beaumont, Ben Thuriaux, Prashanth Prasad and Chandler Hatton at Arthur D. Little, discuss why to apply the principles of agile, the best tactic is to create a separate path tuned specifically to using those methods.

Technology & Innovation Management UK | Irish Tech News | 01 August 2017

Adding agile to improve breakthrough innovation

For the past two decades, the information technology and software world has been applying the agile approach, a highly dynamic innovation model. As a result, the software industry has consistently produced patents at three times the level of the next-most prolific sectors. Today, agile approaches are increasingly being deployed alongside phase-gate processes in engineering and R&D functions outside software, also with positive results. In this article, Mitch Beaumont, Ben Thuriaux, Prashanth Prasad and Chandler Hatton at Arthur D. Little, discuss why companies that have successfully added agile methods to their toolboxes, and tailor their breakthrough innovation approaches by the type of innovation, perform significantly better than those that stick to the traditional waterfall/phase-gate approach.

Technology & Innovation Management | Gulf Industry | 01 December 2016

E-Learning for versatile training and communication in manufacturing

Industrial leaders are pursuing varieties of global transformation initiatives driven by digitalization. E-learning is one of the key elements when it comes to scaling up these initiatives, enabling fast and efficient capability building among the workforce, and thereby ensuring fast payback times for corporate investments. In this article, written by Niklas Brundin, Wolf-Dieter Hoppe, Johan Treutiger, Carl Reiman and Caroline Dedering at Arthur D. Little, the authors discuss why the only way manufacturing companies can continuously train employees in a cost-efficient way in the new digital era is e-learning.

Financial Services, Technology & Innovation Management | Health Matters | 14 November 2016

How pharma companies get ahead in an era of rapid digital change

Innovations coming from outside the traditional healthcare industry span a wide spectrum of products and services, but all take advantage of advances in digital technologies and the ability to analyze and present large amounts of data in new ways. From new biosensor technologies and smart devices to portals and physician guidance tools, there are numerous exciting breakthroughs that allow enhanced self-monitoring capabilities and patient adherence - and ultimately superior clinical decision-making and treatment success. In this article, Ulrica Sehlstedt, Nils Bohlin, Fredrik de Maré and Richard Beetz of Arthur D. Little discuss how a pharma company should act in the midst of this rapid change if it is to stay ahead.

Financial Services, Technology & Innovation Management | International Finance Magazine | 25 October 2016

Implementing Digital

The way customers interact with banks and insurance companies has changed: according to Eurostat and The Financial Brand, as much as 40% of banking customers in the EU are active online banking users. That number rises to 61% in the US. We expect this number to rise to 83%-89% in the EU by 2020. In this article Alejandro Gonzalez and Pedro Fernández of Arthur D. Little, discuss how financial institutions can develop digital strategies as bricks and mortar become obsolete.

Technology & Innovation Management | European Communications | 09 September 2016

Move beyond discounts to monetise fixed mobile convergence

Fixed-mobile convergence has become a reality in Europe, driven by operators in markets with infrastructure-based competition and essentially adopted by customers for its discounts. Behind the nice take-up figures, there is a contrasting reality - the challenge being for operators to capture the value creation potential. In this article, Gregory Pankert of Arthur D. Little discusses why moving beyond discounting is critical to maintain differentiation and secure a positive incremental margin. Operators will need to deepen their understanding of how convergence affects customer segments and value contribution, and translate it into new go-to-market strategies.

Technology & Innovation Management | Connect World: North America: “Internet of Things” | 15 July 2016

How Telcos can “Connect the Dots” Within the Ecosystem

The "Internet of Things" is one of the hottest topics within the global industry environment. All kind of products are becoming "connected" or "smart"- from home appliances to cars and trucks to vending machines and fitness devices (wearables and smart watches). Enabling products to communicate with the outside world offers tremendous opportunities for value-added services and opens up significant space for new and innovative business models around the connected device ("smart object"). However, the market for services around connected devices is still in a relatively immature stage - sustainable business models are in "trial-and-error" mode. In this article Ansgar Schlautmann from Arthur D. Little, discusses how Telco's can connect the dots within the ecosystem.

Technology & Innovation Management | Share Radio | 19 May 2016

The implications of digital transformation in financial institutions

Android Pay launches today and it's the latest example of change in financial services. Digital transformation is turning banks and insurance companies upside down. It's changing how they interact with clients, the products they offer, how they operate internally, and create value for their shareholders. For more of an insight, Alejandro González, one of the authors of the research paper 'Defining the digital organization', joined Share Radio Morning Money.

Search by keyword

In the press (38 Results)

Browse by article

Browse by publication date

| |Bookmark Arthur D. Little