Matthias von Bechtolsheim

Associate Director

Education

University of Cologne (Germany)
PhD (Business Application of Artificial Intelligence)
University of Cologne (Germany)
Business Administration and Management, Information Management, Dipl.-Kfm.

Past Experience

German National Research Center for Computer Science (GMD)
Project Manager
University of Cologne, Institute for Corporate Planning
Research Assistant

Matthias is a Director at Arthur D. Little based in our Frankfurt office, serving clients in the Energy & Utilities industry. 

After joining Arthur D. Little in 1993, Matthias advised clients in the management of information systems, ranging from business-driven IT strategy, organizational transformation of IT departments, outsourcing, and performance improvement including IT cost reduction. He has also served IT service providers ranging from software to service, helping to shape their strategies and improve performance. 

Since 2001, he has focused his engagement on energy & utilities, helping clients to master the liberalization of the industry and later to cope with the challenges and opportunities of the energy transition. Examples of his work include

  • Strategy and partnering approach for new digital products and business models for a German mid-size utility
  • Energy services market analysis and growth strategy for a large European utility
  • Market analysis and opportunity identification in the area of power grid stabilization, energy efficiency and transmission and distribution-grid equipment for an Asian technology group 
  • Design overall governance, roles and responsibilities of Corporate Security Management of a German transmission grid operator (TSO)
  • Review and define improvement measures for the management of offshore-wind park connection projects of a German transmission grid operator (TSO)
  • Market and opportunity analysis of the Austrian market for Smart Metering solutions for an American communication equipment vendor 
  • Decommissioning strategy for a German nuclear operator with multiple nuclear power plants after a short-term shutdown
  • Nuclear new-build procurement strategy and project development for a group of European utilities
  • Organization design of the nuclear new build governance and organization for a German utility
  • Design and implementation of the nuclear new-build project management for a German utility 
  • IT benchmarking, cost reduction and IT reorganization for a large German municipal utility
  • IT strategy for a large German electric utility company after a merger of four single utility companies

Recent Publications

The disrupted energy transition
So, though “net zero” may remain an overarching ambition, how will this severe and unexpected event disrupt the energy transition? In this Viewpoint, we consider how it's possible to move to a cleantech economy while ensuring the security of supply for power and heat.
Clean heat calls for customized decarbonization
We often associate reducing carbon emissions with buying “green” electric power, switching to electric cars, or reducing, reusing, or recycling waste. Indeed, renewable power jumped to 29% market share of global power generation last year, up from 27% in 2019, according to IEA. Yet, only 10% of heat, half of the world’s energy consumption, comes from renewables. Options in decarbonizing heat are more complex and expensive than reducing carbon in power generation. However, heat decarbonization technologies are becoming more attractive.
Wasserstoff – Strategie erforderlich
Spätestens seit der Veröffentlichung der Wasserstoffstrategie der deutschen Bundesregierung ist Wasserstoff zum Dauerthema bei Energieversorgern geworden. Befeuert wird es u.a. durch die Förderprojekte des Bundes, mit denen Regionen und Kommunen Pilotanwendungen planen und realisieren können. Nachdem das Thema jahrelang ein Nischendasein auf der Agenda der Energiewirtschaft fristete, hat es sich binnen kurzer Zeit zu einem Hype entwickelt. Der Strom von Meldungen über Gigawatt-Elektrolyseure und kommunale Pilotprojekte reißt nicht ab.
The future of hydrogen and e-fuels
With intensified discussions to become carbon-free, hydrogen is back at the top of the agenda for some. Others see it as over-hyped with too many limitations, especially with regard to efficiency. Similarly, e-fuels are controversial. Thus, while battery electric vehicles are starting to take off, the future of hydrogen and e-fuels is very much in question. But now players, ranging from nations, corporations, and energy and utility enterprises to start-ups, need to place their bets on the future energy carrier that will replace fossil energy.
Getting ready for the energy consumer of the future
The energy sector is undergoing radical transformation as formerly passive consumers take control over their energy consumption and procurement. Based on the five stages of this transformation, we explain how it impacts the energy value chain and outline the capabilities that traditional providers must embrace if they are to meet the needs of the energy consumer of the future.

Matthias is a Director at Arthur D. Little based in our Frankfurt office, serving clients in the Energy & Utilities industry. 

After joining Arthur D. Little in 1993, Matthias advised clients in the management of information systems, ranging from business-driven IT strategy, organizational transformation of IT departments, outsourcing, and performance improvement including IT cost reduction. He has also served IT service providers ranging from software to service, helping to shape their strategies and improve performance. 

Since 2001, he has focused his engagement on energy & utilities, helping clients to master the liberalization of the industry and later to cope with the challenges and opportunities of the energy transition. Examples of his work include

  • Strategy and partnering approach for new digital products and business models for a German mid-size utility
  • Energy services market analysis and growth strategy for a large European utility
  • Market analysis and opportunity identification in the area of power grid stabilization, energy efficiency and transmission and distribution-grid equipment for an Asian technology group 
  • Design overall governance, roles and responsibilities of Corporate Security Management of a German transmission grid operator (TSO)
  • Review and define improvement measures for the management of offshore-wind park connection projects of a German transmission grid operator (TSO)
  • Market and opportunity analysis of the Austrian market for Smart Metering solutions for an American communication equipment vendor 
  • Decommissioning strategy for a German nuclear operator with multiple nuclear power plants after a short-term shutdown
  • Nuclear new-build procurement strategy and project development for a group of European utilities
  • Organization design of the nuclear new build governance and organization for a German utility
  • Design and implementation of the nuclear new-build project management for a German utility 
  • IT benchmarking, cost reduction and IT reorganization for a large German municipal utility
  • IT strategy for a large German electric utility company after a merger of four single utility companies

Recent Publications

The disrupted energy transition
So, though “net zero” may remain an overarching ambition, how will this severe and unexpected event disrupt the energy transition? In this Viewpoint, we consider how it's possible to move to a cleantech economy while ensuring the security of supply for power and heat.
Clean heat calls for customized decarbonization
We often associate reducing carbon emissions with buying “green” electric power, switching to electric cars, or reducing, reusing, or recycling waste. Indeed, renewable power jumped to 29% market share of global power generation last year, up from 27% in 2019, according to IEA. Yet, only 10% of heat, half of the world’s energy consumption, comes from renewables. Options in decarbonizing heat are more complex and expensive than reducing carbon in power generation. However, heat decarbonization technologies are becoming more attractive.
Wasserstoff – Strategie erforderlich
Spätestens seit der Veröffentlichung der Wasserstoffstrategie der deutschen Bundesregierung ist Wasserstoff zum Dauerthema bei Energieversorgern geworden. Befeuert wird es u.a. durch die Förderprojekte des Bundes, mit denen Regionen und Kommunen Pilotanwendungen planen und realisieren können. Nachdem das Thema jahrelang ein Nischendasein auf der Agenda der Energiewirtschaft fristete, hat es sich binnen kurzer Zeit zu einem Hype entwickelt. Der Strom von Meldungen über Gigawatt-Elektrolyseure und kommunale Pilotprojekte reißt nicht ab.
The future of hydrogen and e-fuels
With intensified discussions to become carbon-free, hydrogen is back at the top of the agenda for some. Others see it as over-hyped with too many limitations, especially with regard to efficiency. Similarly, e-fuels are controversial. Thus, while battery electric vehicles are starting to take off, the future of hydrogen and e-fuels is very much in question. But now players, ranging from nations, corporations, and energy and utility enterprises to start-ups, need to place their bets on the future energy carrier that will replace fossil energy.
Getting ready for the energy consumer of the future
The energy sector is undergoing radical transformation as formerly passive consumers take control over their energy consumption and procurement. Based on the five stages of this transformation, we explain how it impacts the energy value chain and outline the capabilities that traditional providers must embrace if they are to meet the needs of the energy consumer of the future.

More About Matthias
  • University of Cologne (Germany)
    PhD (Business Application of Artificial Intelligence)
  • University of Cologne (Germany)
    Business Administration and Management, Information Management, Dipl.-Kfm.
  • German National Research Center for Computer Science (GMD)
    Project Manager
  • University of Cologne, Institute for Corporate Planning
    Research Assistant