Germany

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Ralf Baron

Partner

Chairman of the Partnership Committee

About Ralf

Ralf is a Partner at Arthur D. Little based in Frankfurt and is Chairman of the Partnership Committee.

Ralf has more than 25 years of experience in management consulting and has worked in the mobility sector for more than 20 years. He advises leading players in the mobility industry and ecosystem on strategic orientation and performance improvement, as well as organizational change and transformation.

As global Head of Arthur D. Little’s T&T practice, Ralf works on mobility issues around the world and addresses key transportation-related topics in various cultural contexts.

CEOs and management board members regularly seek Ralf’s advice as a challenger, change manager, and coach. Ralf is a passionate team worker with strong communications skills and a highly recognized talent to manage group meetings and workshops.

Ralf has served as chairman for leading industry conferences and is a sought-after speaker for conferences and meetings.

Ralf started his career at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, working on technology assessment and innovation.

A core value that Ralf pursues in his work and private life is “respect.”

Education

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
M.A. Political Science

Past Experience

United Nations, Centre for Science and Technology for Development (New York)
Scientific Officer
Institut für Organisationsforschung und Technologieanwendung (IOT)
Researcher and Management Consultant

Insights

Digital business models in freight
Michael Zintel, Ralf Baron, Dennis Mikulla
Autonomous Mobility Journal Edition I I – August 2020
Ralf Baron
Aviation year zero – New non-aero revenues
Ralf Baron, Michael Zintel
Retail shops, food & beverage outlets and car parks are perceived as integral parts of an airport. These so-called “non-aero revenues” have long been a reliable and profitable source of income for airports. However, in recent years, airports’ vital income source has been under attack. Now, due to the COVID-19 crisis, airport terminals around the world are deserted. Is COVID-19 the last bullet that will break airports’ fortress?
The Company of Tomorrow
Ralf Baron
The COVID-19 crisis hit the world as this edition of Prism was in preparation. Needless to say, the outlook for business, at least in the short term, has changed radically in just a few weeks. Nevertheless, it’s becoming increasingly clear that one effect of the crisis has been acceleration of trends that were already there, such as virtualization of the workplace, further penetration of digital technologies (for example, AI and the IoT), and “asset-light” business models that make businesses more responsive and resilient to rapid shocks.
Lost in transformation
Ralf Baron, Michael Zintel, Dennis Mikulla
Transformation has arrived in the transportation & logistics industry. However, we have only just witnessed the start of an extensive change process that will shake up the balance of power. Players unable to adapt to the new reality will face immense pressure, as entire business models are at stake.

Ralf Baron

Partner

Chairman of the Partnership Committee

Germany

Contact & Follow

About Ralf

Ralf is a Partner at Arthur D. Little based in Frankfurt and is Chairman of the Partnership Committee.

Ralf has more than 25 years of experience in management consulting and has worked in the mobility sector for more than 20 years. He advises leading players in the mobility industry and ecosystem on strategic orientation and performance improvement, as well as organizational change and transformation.

As global Head of Arthur D. Little’s T&T practice, Ralf works on mobility issues around the world and addresses key transportation-related topics in various cultural contexts.

CEOs and management board members regularly seek Ralf’s advice as a challenger, change manager, and coach. Ralf is a passionate team worker with strong communications skills and a highly recognized talent to manage group meetings and workshops.

Ralf has served as chairman for leading industry conferences and is a sought-after speaker for conferences and meetings.

Ralf started his career at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, working on technology assessment and innovation.

A core value that Ralf pursues in his work and private life is “respect.”

Education

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
M.A. Political Science

Past Experience

United Nations, Centre for Science and Technology for Development (New York)
Scientific Officer
Institut für Organisationsforschung und Technologieanwendung (IOT)
Researcher and Management Consultant

Insights

Digital business models in freight
Michael Zintel, Ralf Baron, Dennis Mikulla
Autonomous Mobility Journal Edition I I – August 2020
Ralf Baron
Aviation year zero – New non-aero revenues
Ralf Baron, Michael Zintel
Retail shops, food & beverage outlets and car parks are perceived as integral parts of an airport. These so-called “non-aero revenues” have long been a reliable and profitable source of income for airports. However, in recent years, airports’ vital income source has been under attack. Now, due to the COVID-19 crisis, airport terminals around the world are deserted. Is COVID-19 the last bullet that will break airports’ fortress?
The Company of Tomorrow
Ralf Baron
The COVID-19 crisis hit the world as this edition of Prism was in preparation. Needless to say, the outlook for business, at least in the short term, has changed radically in just a few weeks. Nevertheless, it’s becoming increasingly clear that one effect of the crisis has been acceleration of trends that were already there, such as virtualization of the workplace, further penetration of digital technologies (for example, AI and the IoT), and “asset-light” business models that make businesses more responsive and resilient to rapid shocks.
Lost in transformation
Ralf Baron, Michael Zintel, Dennis Mikulla
Transformation has arrived in the transportation & logistics industry. However, we have only just witnessed the start of an extensive change process that will shake up the balance of power. Players unable to adapt to the new reality will face immense pressure, as entire business models are at stake.