Stefano Milanese

Partner

Education

Erasmus University Rotterdam
Master
Politecnico di Torino
Engineering

Stefano is a Partner at Arthur D. Little based in our Milan office, leading the risk practice in Italy. 

With over 15 years of experience in consulting, Stefano has worked on risk management and sustainability issues for important Italian and international companies, especially in the fields of energy, transportation, and manufacturing in Europe, the Middle East, America, and Africa.

Stefano graduated in Engineering at the Politecnico di Torino and holds a Master's at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam.

Recent Publications

Corporate sustainability – Using your ecosystem to sustain the ecosystem
It has been nearly 25 years since the Brundtland Report introduced the modern concept of sustainable development, highlighting its three fundamental components – the environment, the economy, and society. Yet since then, despite the many global, regional, and local goals, pledges, and initiatives, society has been largely ineffective in transforming discussions around sustainability into concrete and strategic actions.
An unprecedented opportunity for a new start
Rethinking corporations’ role for a sustainable future
Risk: Strengthening business resilience after COVID-19
Despite that they had invested in comprehensive crisis management planning, the spread of COVID-19 found many companies ill-prepared, even though it was a known risk with extreme consequences and a reasonable likelihood of occurring. Looking at the evidence, the authors consider the underlying causes of this poor preparedness and set out the key elements of a new business resilience approach suitable for the post- COVID-19 world.
Facing major risks: Getting it right
Many governments, organizations and companies were not adequately prepared to respond to a risk of the scale of COVID-19. Over the last decades various epidemics have occurred, and some leaders and organizations had warned about the possibility of a pandemic crisis causing dramatic global consequences. However, conventional risk and crisis management frameworks have once again proved to be lacking in today’s business environment of uncertainty, complexity and continuous change.
Do companies get the most out of Hazard & Operability (HazOp) analysis?
HazOp analysis is undoubtedly one of the most effective hazard identification techniques in the manufacturing industry. In fact, it is rigorous, reliable and repeatable. However, complex organizations often struggle to integrate safety and operations synergically in this kind of study: dependence on traditional risk assessment schemes consumes time and resources. Based on our experience, HazOp can include further topics that are not typically considered in this methodology. It also proves to be a powerful tool to promote involvement and awareness across departments.

Stefano is a Partner at Arthur D. Little based in our Milan office, leading the risk practice in Italy. 

With over 15 years of experience in consulting, Stefano has worked on risk management and sustainability issues for important Italian and international companies, especially in the fields of energy, transportation, and manufacturing in Europe, the Middle East, America, and Africa.

Stefano graduated in Engineering at the Politecnico di Torino and holds a Master's at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam.

Recent Publications

Corporate sustainability – Using your ecosystem to sustain the ecosystem
It has been nearly 25 years since the Brundtland Report introduced the modern concept of sustainable development, highlighting its three fundamental components – the environment, the economy, and society. Yet since then, despite the many global, regional, and local goals, pledges, and initiatives, society has been largely ineffective in transforming discussions around sustainability into concrete and strategic actions.
An unprecedented opportunity for a new start
Rethinking corporations’ role for a sustainable future
Risk: Strengthening business resilience after COVID-19
Despite that they had invested in comprehensive crisis management planning, the spread of COVID-19 found many companies ill-prepared, even though it was a known risk with extreme consequences and a reasonable likelihood of occurring. Looking at the evidence, the authors consider the underlying causes of this poor preparedness and set out the key elements of a new business resilience approach suitable for the post- COVID-19 world.
Facing major risks: Getting it right
Many governments, organizations and companies were not adequately prepared to respond to a risk of the scale of COVID-19. Over the last decades various epidemics have occurred, and some leaders and organizations had warned about the possibility of a pandemic crisis causing dramatic global consequences. However, conventional risk and crisis management frameworks have once again proved to be lacking in today’s business environment of uncertainty, complexity and continuous change.
Do companies get the most out of Hazard & Operability (HazOp) analysis?
HazOp analysis is undoubtedly one of the most effective hazard identification techniques in the manufacturing industry. In fact, it is rigorous, reliable and repeatable. However, complex organizations often struggle to integrate safety and operations synergically in this kind of study: dependence on traditional risk assessment schemes consumes time and resources. Based on our experience, HazOp can include further topics that are not typically considered in this methodology. It also proves to be a powerful tool to promote involvement and awareness across departments.

More About Stefano
  • Erasmus University Rotterdam
    Master
  • Politecnico di Torino
    Engineering