Turkey

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Samih Coskun Baban

Managing Partner

Head of Arthur D. Little Turkey

About Samih Coskun

Coşkun is the Managing Partner of Arthur D. Little’s Istanbul Office. He has 20 years of consulting experience, focusing on corporate strategy development, business planning and turnaround projects with leading automotive, telecommunication, media and finance players in Greece, Spain, Turkey and the Middle East.

Since joining Arthur D. Little in 2016, Coskun has supported leading conglomerates across multiple strategic fronts, such as growth-strategy formulation, efficiency enhancement, regulatory strategies & market analysis and commercial excellence.

Before joining Arthur D. Little, he had co-established and was responsible for leading Value Partners Management Consulting’s Istanbul Office. He began his career as business analyst at Accenture, where he spent about 10 years and left the firm as Senior Engagement Manager.

Besides his consulting career, Coskun is passionate about demanding sports such as water polo, sailing, skiing and scuba diving.

Education

Bogazici University, Istanbul
BSc, Electrical & Electronics Engineering

Past Experience

Value Partners Management Consulting
Partner
Accenture
Senior Engagement Manager

Insights

Pricing for crisis
Samih Coskun Baban, Serkan Somer, Zeynep Ibis
The current COVID-19 crisis is unprecedented, and the impact on demand across all industry sectors has been brutal. But if companies are to survive and even thrive in this situation, they must develop sales strategies for both the short- and medium-term – however grim the current outlook might be. It is vital to plan for tomorrow and the future. In this viewpoint, we outline the different ways in which pricing and offering can help companies to unlock demand even in a time of social and economic crisis.
After the hype: Where is the carbon car?
Dr. Andreas Schlosser, Samih Coskun Baban, Dr. Philipp Seidel
In 2013, the “carbon hype” in the automotive industry reached a peak when BMW presented an electric mega-city vehicle, the i3, with a fully carbon body. At that time, EVs and stricter CO2 targets were expected to bring the breakthrough for carbon fiber cars. However, five years later, applications for carbon composites are still lacking in mass-market passenger cars, and OEMs have shifted focus back to light metals. Carbon parts still struggle to meet the industrial and economical requirements of car manufacturing.
What’s next for aerospace composites?
Samih Coskun Baban, Dr. Andreas Schlosser, Dr. Philipp Seidel
When the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and Airbus A350 XWB were developed almost a decade ago, they promised a new level of profitability for airlines and huge growth potential for the composites industry. Now that the early struggles are over, composite planes are taking to the skies. Today, the airspace composite components (ACC) market represents the largest demand for composites, even though supply chain struggles are still shaking the industry. Manufacturers are looking for the next growth area, and they may have found it: engines and interiors. Arthur D.
Multi-brand airline groups: A winning approach?
Mathieu Blondel, Samih Coskun Baban
Legacy airlines have long struggled with choosing the best strategy to adopt in the era of hyper-competition, having been faced with i) the rise of low-cost carriers, first in the short-to-medium-haul segment, and now also in the long-haul segment; as well as ii) the natural trend of travelers in a maturing industry increasing in sophistication. Legacy airlines (mostly in Europe and Asia) therefore have decided to create “multi-brand airline holdings” to seize the opportunity of new segments and protect their key markets, but this comes with the risk of cannibalization.

Samih Coskun Baban

Managing Partner

Head of Arthur D. Little Turkey

Turkey

Contact & Follow

About Samih Coskun

Coşkun is the Managing Partner of Arthur D. Little’s Istanbul Office. He has 20 years of consulting experience, focusing on corporate strategy development, business planning and turnaround projects with leading automotive, telecommunication, media and finance players in Greece, Spain, Turkey and the Middle East.

Since joining Arthur D. Little in 2016, Coskun has supported leading conglomerates across multiple strategic fronts, such as growth-strategy formulation, efficiency enhancement, regulatory strategies & market analysis and commercial excellence.

Before joining Arthur D. Little, he had co-established and was responsible for leading Value Partners Management Consulting’s Istanbul Office. He began his career as business analyst at Accenture, where he spent about 10 years and left the firm as Senior Engagement Manager.

Besides his consulting career, Coskun is passionate about demanding sports such as water polo, sailing, skiing and scuba diving.

Education

Bogazici University, Istanbul
BSc, Electrical & Electronics Engineering

Past Experience

Value Partners Management Consulting
Partner
Accenture
Senior Engagement Manager

Insights

Pricing for crisis
Samih Coskun Baban, Serkan Somer, Zeynep Ibis
The current COVID-19 crisis is unprecedented, and the impact on demand across all industry sectors has been brutal. But if companies are to survive and even thrive in this situation, they must develop sales strategies for both the short- and medium-term – however grim the current outlook might be. It is vital to plan for tomorrow and the future. In this viewpoint, we outline the different ways in which pricing and offering can help companies to unlock demand even in a time of social and economic crisis.
After the hype: Where is the carbon car?
Dr. Andreas Schlosser, Samih Coskun Baban, Dr. Philipp Seidel
In 2013, the “carbon hype” in the automotive industry reached a peak when BMW presented an electric mega-city vehicle, the i3, with a fully carbon body. At that time, EVs and stricter CO2 targets were expected to bring the breakthrough for carbon fiber cars. However, five years later, applications for carbon composites are still lacking in mass-market passenger cars, and OEMs have shifted focus back to light metals. Carbon parts still struggle to meet the industrial and economical requirements of car manufacturing.
What’s next for aerospace composites?
Samih Coskun Baban, Dr. Andreas Schlosser, Dr. Philipp Seidel
When the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and Airbus A350 XWB were developed almost a decade ago, they promised a new level of profitability for airlines and huge growth potential for the composites industry. Now that the early struggles are over, composite planes are taking to the skies. Today, the airspace composite components (ACC) market represents the largest demand for composites, even though supply chain struggles are still shaking the industry. Manufacturers are looking for the next growth area, and they may have found it: engines and interiors. Arthur D.
Multi-brand airline groups: A winning approach?
Mathieu Blondel, Samih Coskun Baban
Legacy airlines have long struggled with choosing the best strategy to adopt in the era of hyper-competition, having been faced with i) the rise of low-cost carriers, first in the short-to-medium-haul segment, and now also in the long-haul segment; as well as ii) the natural trend of travelers in a maturing industry increasing in sophistication. Legacy airlines (mostly in Europe and Asia) therefore have decided to create “multi-brand airline holdings” to seize the opportunity of new segments and protect their key markets, but this comes with the risk of cannibalization.