Date

2 min read •

(4) The Technology Lifecycle

Increasing use of “electronification” in infrastructure and the human body


Just think of the predicted images of the future included in young people's magazines during the early post-war period. People's vision of the 21st century included people living in bases on the moon and constructing cities under the oceans.
However, as construction technologies had already reached a mature stage, there was little subsequent evolution. Artificially created human beings growing inside glass containers and robots with real emotion were also predicted, but neither of these things came to pass. That is because life sciences have not yet entered their true growth phase.
On the other hand, in the field of information technology, the real world now goes beyond previous imaginings. Across the world, many hundreds of millions of people carry smart phones which they use not only to exchange information but also to create common global dictionaries or even start political revolutions. These elements were not predicted in past comics. Information technology started entering its growth phase in the late 1980s, and since then has continued to accelerate.
The 20th century was a time where making items electronic added to their value. The articles used in everyday life gradually became electrically-powered, and eventually almost all devices could be electrically controlled. This process of “electronification” looks set to take on two new fields. The first of these is infrastructure and the second is the human body.
Spatial design includes all infrastructure as houses, roads, cities and farms. By using a network of centers throughout the intra-structure agreed, data on the state of change in status of operation can be collected and analyzed. In the mature industry of construction, this "electrification" is beginning to produce new value.
The "electrification" of the body has begun to raise the possibility that changes in blood flow and electromagnetic fields within the brain could be read in order to directly connect the brain with external devices and read off emotions as data. Work is also beginning to apply such concepts to the field of product development.
Looking for connections between the brain, a biological information processing system, and digital technology, is a natural progression. It seems quite certain that the future will bring major advances in this field. Just as post-war movies failed to predict the evolution of the Internet, these developments may also go beyond our imagination.

2 min read •

(4) The Technology Lifecycle

Increasing use of “electronification” in infrastructure and the human body

DATE


Just think of the predicted images of the future included in young people's magazines during the early post-war period. People's vision of the 21st century included people living in bases on the moon and constructing cities under the oceans.
However, as construction technologies had already reached a mature stage, there was little subsequent evolution. Artificially created human beings growing inside glass containers and robots with real emotion were also predicted, but neither of these things came to pass. That is because life sciences have not yet entered their true growth phase.
On the other hand, in the field of information technology, the real world now goes beyond previous imaginings. Across the world, many hundreds of millions of people carry smart phones which they use not only to exchange information but also to create common global dictionaries or even start political revolutions. These elements were not predicted in past comics. Information technology started entering its growth phase in the late 1980s, and since then has continued to accelerate.
The 20th century was a time where making items electronic added to their value. The articles used in everyday life gradually became electrically-powered, and eventually almost all devices could be electrically controlled. This process of “electronification” looks set to take on two new fields. The first of these is infrastructure and the second is the human body.
Spatial design includes all infrastructure as houses, roads, cities and farms. By using a network of centers throughout the intra-structure agreed, data on the state of change in status of operation can be collected and analyzed. In the mature industry of construction, this "electrification" is beginning to produce new value.
The "electrification" of the body has begun to raise the possibility that changes in blood flow and electromagnetic fields within the brain could be read in order to directly connect the brain with external devices and read off emotions as data. Work is also beginning to apply such concepts to the field of product development.
Looking for connections between the brain, a biological information processing system, and digital technology, is a natural progression. It seems quite certain that the future will bring major advances in this field. Just as post-war movies failed to predict the evolution of the Internet, these developments may also go beyond our imagination.