Alan Martinovich

Partner

Head, Strategy & Organization Practice, USA

Education

Columbia University
MBA
University of Toronto
Bachelor of Commerce

Past Experience

Treacy & Company
Managing Director
Level 3 Communications
Senior Director / Strategic Marketing

Alan Martinovich is a Partner in the Boston office of Arthur D. Little, where he heads the North American Strategy & Organization practice. He has over twenty years of experience advising management on issues related to corporate competitiveness, business strategy, strategic marketing, and new product development. He has served both in an external advisory role to C-level executives and as an operating member of senior management teams. 

Prior to joining ADL, Alan served as the Managing Director of Treacy & Company, where he focused on helping Fortune 500 clients in the industrial, healthcare, and insurance sectors develop a disciplined approach to managing growth and shareholder value creation. 

Before Treacy & Company, Mr. Martinovich led the strategic marketing group at Level 3 Communications, a Fortune 500 telecommunications services company. During his tenure with Level 3, Mr. Martinovich played a leadership role in a number of successful corporate initiatives, including the creation of its voice over internet protocol (VOIP) strategy and the formation of its Enterprise Services Group. 

Prior to joining Level 3 Communications, Mr. Martinovich was a Manager with CSMG, a consultancy specializing in the interrelated sectors of telecommunications, IT, and media. Mr. Martinovich worked extensively with a range of industry players on issues related to corporate and business unit strategies, pricing and bundling strategy, marketing positioning, network optimization, and product line profitability. 

Mr. Martinovich received his MBA from Columbia Business School at Columbia University. He holds a Bachelor of Commerce in Economics and Marketing from the University of Toronto.

Recent Publications

When global megatrends run amok
Crises change our world. History tells a simple lesson — the deeper and more severe the crisis, the stronger the transformative effects on long-term societal development. Informative cases are abundant, ranging from the Black Death’s influence on reorganization of medieval agriculture to the ways the experiences of the combined tragedies of WWI and WWII transformed principles and mechanisms of managing the world economy. In retrospect, the long-term impact of these historical transformations has been associated with increasing growth and welfare.    
The pandemic stress test
There’s an old joke that we may have all heard at one time or another: “My doctor asked me if I had ever had a stress test. Sure … it’s called life!” Today, and for some time to come, the COVID-19 pandemic has become part of our daily lives and is providing the biggest stress test of our lifetime.
Growth in the new normal
As challenging as the current economic headwinds may be, many of these forces are likely short-term idiosyncrasies of the post-COVID-19 economic recovery. We believe that several longer-term and even accelerating economic mega-trends will undoubtedly have a profound impact on the global economy in the next five years and must be addressed with immediate and serious executive attention. In this Viewpoint, we cover four global growth mega-trends: 
BYE-BYE COMFORT ZONE, WELCOME VUCA
NOW IS THE RIGHT TIME TO PUT GROWTH ON AGENDA As the global vaccination campaign continues, companies are preparing for the post-COVID-19 economic rebound to rebuild their financial strength and recover ground that they have lost during the COVID recession. Simultaneously, they must also respond to drivers and trends that the pandemic has either induced or significantly accelerated. They must balance the demand surge and digitalization tailwind against supply shortages.
BYE-BYE COMFORT ZONE, WELCOME VUCA
NOW IS THE RIGHT TIME TO PUT GROWTH ON AGENDA As the global vaccination campaign continues, companies are preparing for the post-COVID-19 economic rebound to rebuild their financial strength and recover ground that they have lost during the COVID recession. Simultaneously, they must also respond to drivers and trends that the pandemic has either induced or significantly accelerated. They must balance the demand surge and digitalization tailwind against supply shortages.

Alan Martinovich is a Partner in the Boston office of Arthur D. Little, where he heads the North American Strategy & Organization practice. He has over twenty years of experience advising management on issues related to corporate competitiveness, business strategy, strategic marketing, and new product development. He has served both in an external advisory role to C-level executives and as an operating member of senior management teams. 

Prior to joining ADL, Alan served as the Managing Director of Treacy & Company, where he focused on helping Fortune 500 clients in the industrial, healthcare, and insurance sectors develop a disciplined approach to managing growth and shareholder value creation. 

Before Treacy & Company, Mr. Martinovich led the strategic marketing group at Level 3 Communications, a Fortune 500 telecommunications services company. During his tenure with Level 3, Mr. Martinovich played a leadership role in a number of successful corporate initiatives, including the creation of its voice over internet protocol (VOIP) strategy and the formation of its Enterprise Services Group. 

Prior to joining Level 3 Communications, Mr. Martinovich was a Manager with CSMG, a consultancy specializing in the interrelated sectors of telecommunications, IT, and media. Mr. Martinovich worked extensively with a range of industry players on issues related to corporate and business unit strategies, pricing and bundling strategy, marketing positioning, network optimization, and product line profitability. 

Mr. Martinovich received his MBA from Columbia Business School at Columbia University. He holds a Bachelor of Commerce in Economics and Marketing from the University of Toronto.

Recent Publications

When global megatrends run amok
Crises change our world. History tells a simple lesson — the deeper and more severe the crisis, the stronger the transformative effects on long-term societal development. Informative cases are abundant, ranging from the Black Death’s influence on reorganization of medieval agriculture to the ways the experiences of the combined tragedies of WWI and WWII transformed principles and mechanisms of managing the world economy. In retrospect, the long-term impact of these historical transformations has been associated with increasing growth and welfare.    
The pandemic stress test
There’s an old joke that we may have all heard at one time or another: “My doctor asked me if I had ever had a stress test. Sure … it’s called life!” Today, and for some time to come, the COVID-19 pandemic has become part of our daily lives and is providing the biggest stress test of our lifetime.
Growth in the new normal
As challenging as the current economic headwinds may be, many of these forces are likely short-term idiosyncrasies of the post-COVID-19 economic recovery. We believe that several longer-term and even accelerating economic mega-trends will undoubtedly have a profound impact on the global economy in the next five years and must be addressed with immediate and serious executive attention. In this Viewpoint, we cover four global growth mega-trends: 
BYE-BYE COMFORT ZONE, WELCOME VUCA
NOW IS THE RIGHT TIME TO PUT GROWTH ON AGENDA As the global vaccination campaign continues, companies are preparing for the post-COVID-19 economic rebound to rebuild their financial strength and recover ground that they have lost during the COVID recession. Simultaneously, they must also respond to drivers and trends that the pandemic has either induced or significantly accelerated. They must balance the demand surge and digitalization tailwind against supply shortages.
BYE-BYE COMFORT ZONE, WELCOME VUCA
NOW IS THE RIGHT TIME TO PUT GROWTH ON AGENDA As the global vaccination campaign continues, companies are preparing for the post-COVID-19 economic rebound to rebuild their financial strength and recover ground that they have lost during the COVID recession. Simultaneously, they must also respond to drivers and trends that the pandemic has either induced or significantly accelerated. They must balance the demand surge and digitalization tailwind against supply shortages.

More About Alan
  • Columbia University
    MBA
  • University of Toronto
    Bachelor of Commerce
  • Treacy & Company
    Managing Director
  • Level 3 Communications
    Senior Director / Strategic Marketing