Guillem Casahuga

Partner

Head, TIME Practice, Latin America

Education

ESADE Business School (Spain)
Master in Business Administration
Polytechnic University of Catalonia (Spain)
Engineering, Telecommunications

Past Experience

Europraxis
Partner Latin America
Sony Spain
Engineer

Guillem is a partner based in Arthur D. Little's Houston office.

He leads the Latin America TIME (Telecommunications, Information, Media and Electronics) Practice. His professional focus is on marketing and sales strategies, corporate and growth strategy, business transformation, customer experience management and operational performance improvement.

For many years, Guillem has assisted players in the telecom industry (mobile, fixed, broadband and pay-TV) across Latin American countries.

Guillem received his degree in Telecommunications Engineering from Polytechnic University of Catalonia in Barcelona and an MBA from ESADE, Spain.

He speaks 5 languages: English, Spanish, Portuguese, French and Catalan.

Recent Publications

Attention TowerCos: It’s time to listen to your customer
Rising trend in Latin America Accelerating competition, new technological requirements, and ever-growing data demand have increased CAPEX requirements for MNOs in the Latin America (LATAM) region. Given the necessity of enhancing mobile network reach and capacity, several MNOs have sought cash relief by outsourcing their passive infrastructures to TowerCos, which handle the management of entire networks through built-to-suit (BTS) solutions.
Evolving pricing of mobile tariff plans
The telecom industry is standing at a crossroads, with increasing users, rapid technology shifts, usage shifts to content services, exponential growth in data usage, and ever-increasing competition. Global trends for mobile services show that average revenue per user (ARPU) is declining, whereas data consumption per SIM is increasing. For operators to be future commercial winners, they must provide a higher quality of service and offer larger data packs bundled with added features to increase the price elasticity of demand.
Driving acquisition value with efficient commercial spend
Telecom operators in emerging markets face the challenge of continuously optimizing their commercial architecture to stay economically healthy. Playing in highly competitive markets can lead to overspending to maintain acquisition activity. Aligning commercial spend with acquired value is key to standing out in the market.
The calm before the storm
During the last six years, we have seen a general recovery of the world’s economy from the last big economic crisis in 2008, with some specific and interesting contrast between the advanced and emerging economies. In the first half of this decade (2010–2015), Latin America and the Caribbean (LATAM) enjoyed a steady economic growth of 6.2 percent, while the European Union, the US, Canada and Japan were struggling to reach 2.7 percent annual growth.
Digital transformation in developing countries
We believe it is a mistake to equate the digital-economy development needs and implications of Latin America (and other developing countries) with those of developed economies. These differences are not only based on the purchasepower gaps that every businessperson is aware of, but also how all market forces differ in the two regions. In Figure 2 of this paper, we state how the populations in developing economies (taking Latin America as the example) differ in most of the key attributes needed to drive the development of the digital economy. These include:

Guillem is a partner based in Arthur D. Little's Houston office.

He leads the Latin America TIME (Telecommunications, Information, Media and Electronics) Practice. His professional focus is on marketing and sales strategies, corporate and growth strategy, business transformation, customer experience management and operational performance improvement.

For many years, Guillem has assisted players in the telecom industry (mobile, fixed, broadband and pay-TV) across Latin American countries.

Guillem received his degree in Telecommunications Engineering from Polytechnic University of Catalonia in Barcelona and an MBA from ESADE, Spain.

He speaks 5 languages: English, Spanish, Portuguese, French and Catalan.

Recent Publications

Attention TowerCos: It’s time to listen to your customer
Rising trend in Latin America Accelerating competition, new technological requirements, and ever-growing data demand have increased CAPEX requirements for MNOs in the Latin America (LATAM) region. Given the necessity of enhancing mobile network reach and capacity, several MNOs have sought cash relief by outsourcing their passive infrastructures to TowerCos, which handle the management of entire networks through built-to-suit (BTS) solutions.
Evolving pricing of mobile tariff plans
The telecom industry is standing at a crossroads, with increasing users, rapid technology shifts, usage shifts to content services, exponential growth in data usage, and ever-increasing competition. Global trends for mobile services show that average revenue per user (ARPU) is declining, whereas data consumption per SIM is increasing. For operators to be future commercial winners, they must provide a higher quality of service and offer larger data packs bundled with added features to increase the price elasticity of demand.
Driving acquisition value with efficient commercial spend
Telecom operators in emerging markets face the challenge of continuously optimizing their commercial architecture to stay economically healthy. Playing in highly competitive markets can lead to overspending to maintain acquisition activity. Aligning commercial spend with acquired value is key to standing out in the market.
The calm before the storm
During the last six years, we have seen a general recovery of the world’s economy from the last big economic crisis in 2008, with some specific and interesting contrast between the advanced and emerging economies. In the first half of this decade (2010–2015), Latin America and the Caribbean (LATAM) enjoyed a steady economic growth of 6.2 percent, while the European Union, the US, Canada and Japan were struggling to reach 2.7 percent annual growth.
Digital transformation in developing countries
We believe it is a mistake to equate the digital-economy development needs and implications of Latin America (and other developing countries) with those of developed economies. These differences are not only based on the purchasepower gaps that every businessperson is aware of, but also how all market forces differ in the two regions. In Figure 2 of this paper, we state how the populations in developing economies (taking Latin America as the example) differ in most of the key attributes needed to drive the development of the digital economy. These include:

More About Guillem
  • ESADE Business School (Spain)
    Master in Business Administration
  • Polytechnic University of Catalonia (Spain)
    Engineering, Telecommunications
  • Europraxis
    Partner Latin America
  • Sony Spain
    Engineer